Choosing tapware that looks good and lasts

The kitchen tap is one of the hardest working pieces of equipment in a residential property. From filling the kettle to washing up, it is used constantly throughout every day. Therefore it is essential for your next project to choose taps that not only look good, but are built to last.

Tap into your design needs

A kitchen tap should be chosen for its perfect balance of design and function. It should enhance the work area and be effortless to use, even with greasy hands.

Design

When deciding on tapware, make sure you choose taps that are easy to use and suit your style of the property you are developing. For a modern and contemporary scheme, you may lean towards square designs, and with a more traditional/classic theme, you may opt for round designs. A smooth movement of the lever is important to the user in order to ensure a precise adjustment of water flow or temperature.

Two-handle taps
The classic styling of a two-handle taps allows them to adapt to any kitchen environment. Mounted in a single hole in the sink or the worktop, they feature individual levers or handles to control the hot and cold water supplies.

Single-lever tap
Single-lever mixer taps enable you to control the water flow and temperature with one hand. Ceramic discs in the tap cartridge allow fingertip control of the water mix, leaving your other hand free to use the rinsing spray. Levers can either be mounted on the top or at the side of the tap body.

Photo credit: Henley

Compliance

The tapware chosen has to have Watermark compliance and a Wels flow rating on the product or packaging – otherwise the plumber will be unable to install it. Australia and New Zealand are the only countries globally that require DR Brass rather than standard brass. This means the costs of producing tapware here is substantially more unless the production runs are very large.  Some manufacturers do take shortcuts so make sure you are not left vulnerable from your product choice.

Durability

Poor quality kitchen taps are light-weight.  The faucet body is thin and does not provide a solid feel.  The connections are prone to breaking off or leaking, and the replaceable parts might be difficult to source separately.  Some parts such as nozzles and handles might even be plastic.  Some taps are cheap and reliable due to high production volumes, but many are cheap and unreliable.

It is false economy to buy cheap tapware. If your budget is tight, try and save money elsewhere in the kitchen design.

 

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