11-13 Oct 2021
Darling Harbour, ICC SYDNEY

Initiative to transform the design and production of buildings in Australia

Apr 4, 2020 Technology

Reducing waste, delays and emissions from building projects is the focus of a collaborative initiative between 30 industry partners.

Monash University, University of Melbourne, Queensland University of Technology, Green Building Council of Australia, Standards Australia, along with 25 other partners, have been successful in securing funding to establish the Building 4.0 CRC – an initiative seeking to transform how buildings are designed and manufactured in Australia.

The $28 million grant will leverage a combined $103 million from industry, government and research partners – bringing the combined research budget to $131 million over seven years.

The Building 4.0 CRC research initiative is focused on use of digital solutions, new products and processes aiming to transform Australia’s building industry to a tech-enabled, collaborative future where the customer is at the centre of each building experience and buildings are not only better, but faster, cheaper and safer.

The CRC will be based at Monash University in partnership with the University of Melbourne, and in collaboration with the Queensland University of Technology.

Some of the outcomes this initiative hopes to achieve include:

  • 30 per cent reduction in project costs through digital technology and off-site manufacturing
  • 40 per cent reduction in project delays
  • 80 per cent reduction in construction waste
  • 50 per cent reduction in Co2 emissions for more sustainable buildings.

“Building 4.0 CRC demonstrates that industry and government can come together to solve the big issues facing the building industry today,” Monash University’s Professor Mathew Aitchison, Interim CEO of Building 4.0 CRC, said.

“By leveraging this government funding and our deep collaboration with research and training partners, we are committed to putting the Australian industry at the forefront of global developments.”

Dr Bronwyn Evans, Chair of Building 4.0 CRC said the Building 4.0 CRC is going to be a really important factor in making sure Australia has a competitive future and broad sector needs are addressed.

Building 4.0 CRC will bring together expertise in the fields of architecture, design, planning, construction, engineering, business, information technology and law to develop industry-wide practices and protocols intended to transform the entire sector.

It will also leverage the latest technologies, data science and artificial intelligence to enable the application of robotics and digital fabrication to optimise all phases of building delivery – including development, design, production, assembly, operation, maintenance and end-of-life.

Professor Margaret Gardner AC, Monash University President and Vice-Chancellor, said: “Building 4.0 CRC will lead to a growth in high-value employment, a reduction in greenhouse gases, and create better housing that is more affordable, liveable and environmentally friendly for the future of all Australians.

Building 4.0 CRC comprises 30 leading players in commercial industry, university, industry bodies and government partners, including: Monash University, University of Melbourne, Lendlease, Donovan Group, BlueScope Steel, CSR, Utecture Australia, Bentley Homes, Coresteel Australia, A.G Coombs, Ultimate Aluminium Windows, Queensland University of Technology, Holmesglen Institute, Hyne Timber, Shapeshift Design Technologies, M-Modular, Schiavello Manufacturing, Gelion Technologies, YNOMIA, Fleetwood, Master Builders Association of Victoria, PrefabAUS, Salesforce, Sumitomo Forestry, Green Building Council of Australia, Standards Australia, Taronga Venture Advisory, Victorian Building Authority and the Victorian Government Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions.

First Published on Build Australia

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